The Puddledock Press Staff in the early 1990s.

The all volunteer staff of the Puddledock Press outside their storefront office in the Hayward Block on Mechanic Street in the early 1990s.

The first issue of The Puddledock Press.

The very first Puddledock Press, Volume 1, Number 1, was published in December of 1979.

Farmington Town Christmas Party

The Town of Farmington used to have a Town Christmas Party. Here is a 1963 ad from the Farmington News.

Fire trucks outside the Station on Mechanic Street

Mechanic Street Fire Station in its hay day. On the left is the 1942 Seagrave Truck which was given to the town by H.O. Rondeau.

An old group photo hanging in the Puddledock Office.

Back: Ned Parker, Delores Bridge, Mary Cloutman, Henry Johnson; Front: Iola Sabine, Lilliam Emerson

Robert's Drug Store Christmas advertisement in 1906.

Robert's Drug Store was a popular spot in downtown Farmington and sold lots of Farmington post cards.

Old Farmington Town Hall

An old photo of the Farmington Town Hall, which is currently the Recreation Center, as it appeared in an issue of the Farmington News.

Fire Destroys the Trafton Block

The Trafton Block after a fire destroyed it on January 15, 1943. The fire damages totaled $50,000.

Sunday, December 18, 2016

Puddledock Connects to Kids with new Column



Local readers have requested a comeback of a previously managed section of the paper. In December 1979 Volume 1 Number 1 of the Puddledock Press a section called Creative Corner was published sharing the writings of Farmington students with the community. Kids Corner will be a modern rendition of Creative Corner. The paper will accept writing submissions from any student who resides in Farmington. A lottery process will be used to select a single piece to go to print with the rest of the paper in hardcopy and online format. Each month will be a different writing selection. Due to limited print space, other submissions will receive recognition through a special section to be published online only.


The rules: article submissions must be electronic, editable and e-mailed to Kid’s Corner editor Tom Naro at tom@coppolapt.com. Size of the writing is preferred to be under 300 words. Longer submissions may be edited in length to highlight sections of the piece so it can fit the paper’s available space.Topics of any interest will be reviewed. Here are some suggested themes: heroism, love, victory, tragedy, beauty, holidays, family, life lessons, coming of age, the future, inspiration, sorrow, reality, identity, power, overcoming and hope. Style of writing can be expository, descriptive, persuasive, or narrative. Short stories, poems, essays, news, reviews, opinions, nature, and most of anything else is encouraged.


The student’s first name, age and school will be mentioned along side her or his writing. Farmington has students who attend public school, private school, do home schooling, and those who utilize distance learning. Any student from early learning through high school levels are asked to produce individual or group work. To make the selection easier for the editors, we ask teachers, parents, or groups leaders to screen selections from their students and send directly to the Kids’ Corner editor.


To provide an example here’s something that was printed in the very first issue of the Puddledock Press from Mrs. Collins’ eighth grade reading class by Robert Suydam.


Many people have heard stories about heroes long ago, but do not realize that people still qualify for being a hero today.I believe my father could be a hero today because, in my eyes, he qualifies as a hero. First of all, he is very brave. He served in the Marines and fought in World War II. He is not scared of anything. He is also very strong and uses his strength wisely. He is not mean unless he has to be.When it comes to fairness and dedication to duty, my father is the tops. All in all, my father has all the qualities of a hero.

Kids’ Corner is sponsored by Coppola Physical Therapy Farmington.

Tuesday, December 6, 2016

Error in December Issue Advertisement.

Unfortunately, we printed the wrong website address for Kyle Leach's Happiness Tree Decor ad in the December issue.  This error only appears in the printed copy.  The online copy has the correct website address.  We apologize for this inconvenience.  Please visit the webpage and support our sponsors.



The December Issue of the Puddledock Press Is Here

The December edition of the Puddledock Press is out at our distribution sites now or will be very soon.  Visit your local Farmington carrier of the Puddledock and get your issue now.

It also has been posted on the Puddledock Press website and the Farmington Historical Society's Scribd site, and is available for viewing online. It is also available in the archives of both Puddledock Press and the Farmington Historical Society websites.

Please consider advertising in the Puddledock Press.  Your support through advertising helps build connections to the community.    Price. Quality. Community.  That is the commitment the Puddledock Press makes to you. See our Advertising Page for details

Online and mail subscriptions are also available.

Don't forget to Take your Puddledock with you when you travel and take a selfie with the Puddledock at your destination.  Submit it for publication in our Where in the World is the Puddledock Press column.  Let's see how far we can spread our community newspaper.

Saturday, November 5, 2016

The November Issue of the Puddledock Press is Available Online and in Hard Copy.

The November edition of the Puddledock Press has been posted on the Puddledock Press website and the Farmington Historical Society's Scribd site, and is available for viewing online. It is also available in the archives of both Puddledock Press and the Farmington Historical Society websites.
Hard copies are out at most of our local Farmington distribution sites, as well.

Please consider advertising in the Puddledock Press.  Your support through advertising helps build connections to the community.    Price. Quality. Community.  The Puddledock Press commitment to you. Online and mail subscriptions are also available.


Friday, October 7, 2016

The October Issue of the Puddledock Press is Now Available

The October edition of the Puddledock Press has been posted on the Farmington Historical Society's Scribd site, and is available for viewing online.

You can view and download and print the issue in color from the Scribd site, if you wish.  The hard copies are at most of our fine distribution sites in Farmington, now, and will be delivered to the remaining locations shortly.

You can view past issues on the Farmington Historical Society's Puddledock Press page.

Please, remember to thank our local establishments for carrying the Puddledock.   Likewise, be sure to visit and thank our many local businesses that support the Puddledock Press through their advertising. It is our Farmington businesses, and our local volunteers, who keep our paper alive and thriving for our Community.

Send in your articles and photographs to be included in the next Puddledock Press.  If you submit your news by the 15th of the month, it will be guaranteed to get in the next month's issue.  Email your news and photos to PuddledockPress@gmail.com.

You can view past issues on the Farmington Historical Society's Puddledock Press page.

Monday, September 5, 2016

The September 2016 Puddledock Press is Now Available in Town and Online!

The September edition of the Puddledock Press has been posted on the Farmington Historical Society's Scribd site, and is available for viewing online.

You can view and download and print the issue in color from the Scribd site, if you wish.  The hard copies are at most of our fine distribution sites in Farmington, now, and will be delivered to the remaining locations shortly.

You can view past issues on the Farmington Historical Society's Puddledock Press page.

Please, remember to thank our local establishments for carrying the Puddledock.   Likewise, be sure to visit and thank our many local businesses that support the Puddledock Press through their advertising. It is our Farmington businesses, and our local volunteers, who keep our paper alive and thriving for our Community.

Send in your articles and photographs to be included in the next Puddledock Press.  If you submit your news by the 15th of the month, it will be guaranteed to get in the next month's issue.  Email your news and photos to PuddledockPress@gmail.com.

You can view past issues on the Farmington Historical Society's Puddledock Press page.

Tuesday, August 16, 2016

Farmington School District 2016 - 2017 Bus Routes

Farmington School District Bus Routes for 2016-2017 Start of School


Route 1  Kim B  #2   
6:35 A.M: River road, left onto Hornetown Rd, after the Ten Rod Road ,  right onto Meaderboro Rd, turn around, follow Meaderboro Rd to 4 corners,
turn right on Reservoir Road, corner Sheepboro & Reservoir Rd, turn left on Sheepboro Road, turn left onto Crown Point Road, turn left onto Evans Road, turn left onto Meaderboro Road, turn right onto Poor Farm Rd, next onto Henry Wilson Memorial , Farmington High, Valley View, approximately 7:40 A.M.

Route 2   Tammi T  #3  
6:40 A.M: Camerons Development, turn right on NH Rt 11, left onto Ridge Road, turn around on Quaker Rd, turn right on Hornetown Rd, Right on Ten Rod Road, turnaround, cross over Ten Rod Road, Flowing Brook,  Blueberry Drive, Flowing Brook, turn Left onto MeetingHouse Hill Rd, onto Farmington High, Valley View, Henry Wilson, approximately 7:40 A.M.

Route 3 Gil  #16   
6:55  A.M: Main Street starting at Montgomery Drive, Crossover NH Rt 11, up Meetinghousehill Road onto Ten Rod Road, turn around, continue on Meetinghousehill Road, turn right at light onto NH Rt ll, turn around at Rochester Line,  next onto Henry Wilson School, Farmington High School, Valley View, approximately 7:40 A.M.

Route  4    Michelle #8  
7:05  A.M:  Grondin Drive, end of Golden Circle Drive, turn left on Governor’s Rd, Labrador Drive, left onto Dodge Cross Road, end of Little City Road, turn right on Chestnut Hill Road, onto Henry Wilson Memorial, Farmington High, Valley View, approximately 7:40 A.M.

Route 5    Kim N  #10  
7:20  A.M:   Cochecco Road , 1st & 2nd Entrance to Old  Peacefull Pines, entrance to new Peaceful Pines, turn right on Chestnut Hill, turnaround, Tall Pine Road, Branson Rd,  Brown Rd, White Birch Lane, turn right onto Elm St, turn around, Dick Dame Lane,  on to Henry Wilson Memorial, Farmington High, Valley View, approximately 7:45 A.M.

Route  6  Tammy D #7  
6:50 a.m:,  end of Milton Rd, turn left on Waldron Rd,  right on Silver Street,  turn around on Curtis Road,  Silver St, turn  right on Waldron Road, end of Fox Trot Road, right onto Cherub Drive, left onto Holly Lane,  right  onto Bay Road , turn around top of hill,  back thru town turn right onto Central Street , left onto Tappan Street, Right onto NH Route 11, Colonial Circle, Trotting Park Road, turn right onto NH Route 11,  Strafford Motel (students must stand by last driveway heading towards Alton, bus no longer will go into the Motels driveway), turn right onto Spring Street,  onto Farmington High, Valley View,  Henry Wilson,
approximately 7:35  A.M.

Bus # 1  48 passenger     Lynn #1  
All students will be notified as to pickup and drop off times.

Please note: These times are subject to change as enrollments change.


Important Updates and Information

  • All Farmington Schools will be starting school at 7:50 AM again this year.  
  • Please do not drop off students at any of the schools before 7:30 am.
  • Buses will be dropping students off  and picking up students in the back of the Henry Wilson School by the gym doors.  Parents are to drop off and pickup car rider students in the front of the Henry Wilson School.
  • Drop off and pick up of high school students is out back of the school, not in front as in previous years.
  • Morning drop off for Valley View Car riders is again out front, Buses will be dropping off students in the back of the school.
  • Dismissal for Valley View School is 2:25 for buses only.  Parents will pick up car riders after the buses exit the school.
  • Dismissal for Farmington High School is 2:31 pm, Henry Wilson School is 2:35 pm.


Saturday, August 13, 2016

August 2016 Puddledock Press is Out Now!

The August edition of the Puddledock Press has been posted on the Farmington Historical Society's Scribd site, and is available for viewing online.

You can view and download and print the issue in color from the Scribd site, if you wish.  The hard copies are at most of our fine distribution sites in Farmington, now, and will be delivered to the remaining locations shortly.

You can view past issues on the Farmington Historical Society's Puddledock Press page.

Please, remember to thank our local establishments for carrying the Puddledock.   Likewise, be sure to visit and thank our many local businesses that support the Puddledock Press through their advertising. It is our Farmington businesses, and our local volunteers, who keep our paper alive and thriving for our Community.

Send in your articles and photographs to be included in the next Puddledock Press.  If you submit your news by the 15th of the month, it will be guaranteed to get in the next month's issue.  Email your news and photos to PuddledockPress@gmail.com.
You can view past issues on the Farmington Historical Society's Puddledock Press page.

Sunday, July 10, 2016

The July 2016 Puddledock Press is Now Available in Town and Online!

The July edition of the Puddledock Press has been posted on the Farmington Historical Society's Scribd site, and is available for viewing online.

You can view and download and print the issue in color from the Scribd site, if you wish.  The hard copies are at most of our fine distribution sites in Farmington, now, and will be delivered to the remaining locations shortly.

You can view past issues on the Farmington Historical Society's Puddledock Press page.

Please, remember to thank our local establishments for carrying the Puddledock.   Likewise, be sure to visit and thank our many local businesses that support the Puddledock Press through their advertising. It is our Farmington businesses, and our local volunteers, who keep our paper alive and thriving for our Community.

Send in your articles and photographs to be included in the next Puddledock Press.  If you submit your news by the 15th of the month, it will be guaranteed to get in the next month's issue.  Email your news and photos to PuddledockPress@gmail.com.
You can view past issues on the Farmington Historical Society's Puddledock Press page.

Saturday, June 18, 2016

Farmington High School Graduates 86


Commencement Exercises were held at the Farmington High School Gymnasium at 10:00 AM on June 18.  The Invocation was given by Molly King; Megan Henner led the Pledge of Allegiance; and Rachel Morin sang the National Anthem.  Afer Class President Kyley Inglis gave her Presidential address Salutatorian Emma Gelinas and Valedictorian Marilu Shepadrson addressed their classmates.  The Commencement speaker was former teacher Catherine Howard, who reminded the graduates that respect should be given to all, but trust must be earned.  She cautioned them to not confuse the two in the years ahead.  Following the Senior Awards and presentation of diplomas, Emily Watson gave the Benediction.  Brooke Marston and Samantha Lagle served as the Class Marshalls.  Ms. Allison Lowe and Ms Ashley Mercier served as the class advisors.

The Class chose "Wherever I Go by Miley Cyrus as their Class song, and "Go Big or Go Home" as their Class Motto.

Pictures from the ceremony are shared in the FHE Graduation Photos 18 June 2016 folder.

Sunday, June 5, 2016

Farmington Players Present "Mobile Home Sweet Home" June 17 and 18

Farmington Town Players Present
Mobile Home Sweet Home
by Pat Cook
Produced by special arrangement with Eldridge Publishing Company.
Friday, June 17 and Saturday, June 18, 2016
7:00 PM Farmington Town Hall
$8.00 Admission, $5.00 Children

“How’d you like to be on television?” This question, posed by future daughter-in-law Anne, takes Loff DuVall by surprise. After all, he and May June had been running the Hampton Court trailer park for more years than either would care to admit. The last thing he’d want now is to be in some reality TV show. In fact, he was hoping he and May June could get away for a while, take a long vacation from the place. He wouldn’t have to listen to Goose Halford’s long stories, such as how his grandpa has a metal plate in his head. “The kids used to catch him asleep and put ‘frigerator magnets on his forehead,” he confides in Loff. Or having to help Lydia Spagway’s grandkid who just got her hand caught in a toilet. Add to this Rhonda DeFalco’s gossip, Vonell Rafferty looking for buried treasure with her metal detector, and Etta Frobisher’s threat to close down his business, he’s really at the end of his rope. But Anne’s idea, coupled with the fact she’s practically engaged to son, Larry, shows Loff a way out. Except that, for the show to succeed, Loff can’t leave! Throw in a conniving producer, a retired lieutenant colonel and everyone showing up looking like run-over hillbillies and Loff or May June just don’t know what’s to become of them, their tenants, or the trailer park. This two-act comedy is full of oddball characters and will have your audience laughing and falling in love with all those at Hampton Court Trailer Park.
The Cast of Mobile Home Sweet Home, June 2016
Act 1 Scene 1 action
Act 1 Scene 2 action
Act 1 Scene 3 action
Download the Mobile Home Sweet Home program from the Farmington Town Players.

For over 30 years, the Farmington Town Players has taken great pride in presenting a wide variety of entertainment for Farmington audiences.  Attending and supporting the productions and performances of the Town Players not only supports the Arts in Farmington, but allows the Town Players to contribute back to the community through the financial donations the Troupe makes to other programs and needs in the Town of Farmington.

So please, mark your calendars and plan on bringing family and friends to the special evening of theatre.  The Town Players wish to thank all their patrons, old and new, and send their warmest “Welcome” for your support of this production.

Friday, June 3, 2016

June 2016 issue is out and available online and in print form

The June issue of the Puddledock Press is out online and available at most of our local distribution sites for pick up.  The issue has been posted on the Farmington Historical Society's Scribd site, and is now available for viewing online. You can view and download and print the issue in color from the Scribd site, if you wish.
To find out where to pick up your printed hard copy, check the Find a Puddledock tab on this site, and select Current Edition for the list of our fine Farmington businesses that carry the Puddledock Press! Don't forget to thank these establishments for carrying the Puddledock, visit them often, and remind them how you appreciate their supporting our paper, and that you'd love to see them advertise in the paper!

Please consider placing an ad in the paper for your business or non-profit organization.  You can help to support our Community newspaper and our services like the Around the Town Calendar, and online access.  Consider running an ad or just sending in a contribution.

Hope you enjoy the June issue! Start submitting your news and articles for our upcoming June issue now.

Sunday, May 8, 2016

62nd Annual High School Reunion and Banquet Scheduled for June 4, 2016

The 62nd Annual High School Reunion and Banquet is scheduled for June 4, 2016 at the Farmington High School on Thayer Drive.

The doors will open at 4:30 p.m. so that early birds can come in, chat and have a place to sit down.  We will also have punch and cheese and crackers available.  The banquet will begin at 6:00 p.m. and there is plenty of parking.

Our caterer, Brenda Page and her staff have promised us a delicious buffet style dinner.  The price will be $17.00 per person.  We will also have a donation basket at the entrance to help with our costs.

Please make your reservation and send a check, payable to FHS Alumni Association, by May 20, 2016 to:
     Cindy Kingsbury
     PO Box 807, Wakefield, NH  03872
     (603)986-6243

Class of 1966  - 50th Reunion
(Girls are by maiden name)

Gwendolyn Allen      Barry Elliott Margaret Jenness Don Place
Anne Allfrey       Betty Gates Cynthia King Sandra Rouleau
Joyce Batchelder Sally Golding Jan Kuligowski Mary Rundlett
Wayne Butler       Kenneth Gray Paul LaPierre James Schulte
Alfred Cameron        Robert Gray Marcia Leary Ann Scruton
Linda Campbell       Sarah Guay Susan Lepene Donna Secord
Nancy Cardinal        Allan Gullison William Lessard Brenda Smith
Sheila Cardinal        Sally Hart Russell McPherson John Thivierge
Howard Champagne       Phyllis Hassen Albert Menard Jr Donald Thurston
Alan Chesley       Micheline Hoage Donald Mitchell David Vachon
Shirley Colbath Roberta Hoage Catherine Mooney Rodney Waldron
Albert Currier Jr Carolyn Hooper Marilyn Mosher Barry Whalen
Verne Day       Patricia Hooper Judith Moulton Nancy Williams
Regina Drew       Allen Hudson Bernard Nason  Jr Arvard Worster

We are looking forward to a great evening.

Sincerely yours,

Robert Champagne (Class of 1961) Cindy (Hoage) Kingsbury (Class of 1976)
Master of Ceremonies         Betsy (Stevens) Gorney (Class of 1986)
                        Treasurers


Friday, April 29, 2016

The May issue of the Puddledock Press is available online or at many of our distribution sites now.

The May issue of the Puddledock Press is out online and available at most of our local distribution sites for pick up.  The remainder of the locations will receive theirs on Tuesday, May 3. The issue has been posted on the Farmington Historical Society's Scribd site, and is now available for viewing online. You can view and download and print the issue in color from the Scribd site, if you wish.
To find out where to pick up your printed hard copy, check the Find a Puddledock tab on this site, and select Current Edition for the list of our fine Farmington businesses that carry the Puddledock Press! Don't forget to thank these establishments for carrying the Puddledock, visit them often, and remind them how you appreciate their supporting our paper, and that you'd love to see them advertise in the paper!

Please consider placing an ad in the paper for your business or non-profit organization.  You can help to support our Community newspaper and our services like the Around the Town Calendar, and online access.  Consider running an ad or just sending in a contribution.

Hope you enjoy the May issue! Start submitting your news and articles for our upcoming June issue now.

Friday, April 1, 2016

The April 2016 issue of the Puddledock Press is available now.


The April issue of the Puddledock Press is out online and available at most of our local distribution sites for pick up.  The remainder of the locations will receive theirs by Tuesday, April 5. The issue has been posted on the Farmington Historical Society's Scribd site, and is now available for viewing online. You can view and download and print the issue in color from the Scribd site, if you wish. 
To find out where to pick up your printed hard copy, check the Find a Puddledock tab on this site, and select Current Edition for the list of our fine Farmington businesses that carry the Puddledock Press!  Don't forget to thank these establishments for carrying the Puddledock, visit them often, and remind them how you appreciate their supporting our paper, and that you'd love to see them advertise in the paper!  

Please consider placing an ad in the paper for your business or non-profit organization.  You can help to support our Community newspaper and our services like the Around the Town Calendar, and online access.  Consider running an ad or just sending in a contribution.  

Hope you enjoy the April issue! Start submitting your news and articles for our upcoming May issue now. 

Friday, March 4, 2016

The March 2016 issue of the Puddledock Press is Available


The March issue of the Puddledock Press is out online and available at most of our local distribution sites for pick up on Friday, March 4. The issue has been posted on the Farmington Historical Society's Scribd site, and is now available for viewing online. You can view and download and print the issue in color from the Scribd site, if you wish. 
To find out where to pick up your printed hard copy, check the Find a Puddledock tab on this site, and select Current Edition for the list of our fine Farmington businesses that carry the Puddledock Press!  Don't forget to thank these establishments for carrying the Puddledock, visit them often, and remind them how you appreciate their supporting our paper, and that you'd love to see them advertise in the paper!  

Please consider placing an ad in the paper for your business or non-profit organization.  You can help to support our Community newspaper and our services like the Around the Town Calendar, and online access.  Consider running an ad or just sending in a contribution.  

Hope you enjoy the March issue! Start submitting your news and articles for our April issue now. 

Friday, February 26, 2016

Registration Open for Full Day Kindergarten at Valley View Community School

Starting in Sept 2016, Kindergarten at Valley View Community School will expand to full-day sessions, partially funded through our Title 1 grant. Valley View Community School is taking registrations for Kindergarten for the 2016-17 school year between March 7 and March 18. Please go to the school office between the hours of 8:00 and 3:00 to register children who will be 5 years old on or before Sept 30, 2016.

Friday, February 5, 2016

Election Season Starts with New Hampshire Primary

Farmington will have several Election Days this year!  The first two will occur on February 9 and on March 8.  This is a Presidential election year, so New Hampshire’s First in the Nation Primary will be held on Tuesday, February 9.  Town Election Day is always the 2nd Tuesday in March, which is March 8. Farmington Town Meeting is always held the Wednesday after town election day.  Town Meeting will be on Wednesday, March 9.  You'll get a chance to review the town budget and have your say in how our town spends its revenues.

In order to register to vote, New Hampshire citizens who are at least 18 years of age must demonstrate proof of residency and register with the Town Clerk, or the Supervisors of the Checklist, on Election Day or at the posted Supervisor’s meetings.  Once registered as a voter, your name will appear on the Town Voter Check, and you will be able to vote in a  future elections.  Town citizens should exercise their right to vote. You can register at the Municipal Building by filling out a NH Voter Registration Form, bring along your id (driver’s license, or passport, or birth certificate), and proof of residency (mail delivered to a Farmington address, or your Farmington tax bill).

In New Hampshire, no one is permitted to register to vote after ten (10) days prior to an election, except voter registration is accepted on Election Day. This ten day gap allows the Supervisors of the Checklist time to update and print the Checklist that will be used at the polls on Election Day.
If you are a registered voter, or will register to vote at least ten days in advance of an election, and are unable to vote at the polls on Election Day, due to absence from town or physical disability, you may obtain an absentee ballot from the Town Clerk.

The civic responsibility of voting is an important right for all Americans and the foundation of our democratic society.  We all  should exercise our right to vote at every opportunity.  Voting is our chance to voice our opinions, and take an active part in what happens in our town, state, and nation.  The first line in the introduction to Voting is an Ethical Issue from the Princeton Press, states "When we vote, we can make government better or worse.  In turn, our voters can make people's lives better or worse." (http://press.princeton.edu/chapters/i9464.pdf) It is as simple as that.  Hopefully, we vote to make things better.

In New Hampshire, we have a semi-open voting system. A registered member of one party cannot votet in the other Party's primary.  But, it does allow registered independent voters to choose the  ballot for the Party of their choice when they vote.  New Hampshire state law requires the Secretary of State to move the primary's date to one week before any similar Primary election.
Please remember to vote in all elections.

This is the February issue cover story, but elections and voting are important, so I thought I would share our feature story online with you.  - sjf.

Thursday, February 4, 2016

The February 2016 Issue of the Puddledock is Out

The February issue of the Puddledock Press is out online and will be delivered to our local distribution sites for pick up on Friday, February 5.  Because the cover story deals with our upcoming New Hampshire First in the Nation primary, I will release the online version before the hard copies are available.  The issue has been posted on the Farmington Historical Society's Scribd site, and is now available for viewing online. You can view and download and print the issue in color from the Scribd site, if you wish. 
To find out where to pick up your printed hard copy, check the Find a Puddledock tab on this site, and select Current Edition for the list of our fine Farmington businesses that carry the Puddledock Press!  Don't forget to thank these establishments for carrying the Puddledock, visit them often, and remind them how you appreciate their supporting our paper, and that you'd love to see them advertise in the paper!  

Please consider placing an ad in the paper for your business or non-profit organization.  You can help to support our Community newspaper and our services like the Around the Town Calendar, and online access.  Consider running an ad or just sending in a contribution.  

Hope you enjoy the February issue! Start submitting your news and articles for our March issue now. 

Tuesday, February 9th is our New Hampshire First in the Nation Primary.  Don't forget to vote!


Puddledock Press February 2016

Friday, January 15, 2016

January 2016 Puddledock Press is Available Now!

The January issue has been posted on the Farmington Historical Society's Scribd site, and is now available for viewing online. You can view and download and print the issue in color from the Scribd site, if you wish. 
Printed hard copies of the January issue have been distributed and are now available at all our fine distribution sites in Farmington.  To find out where to pick up your printed hard copy, check the Find a Puddledock tab on this site, and select Current Edition for the list of our fine Farmington b usinesses that carry the Puddledock Press!  Don't forget to thank these establishments for carrying the Puddledock, visit them often, and remind them how you appreciate their supporting our paper, and that you'd love to see them advertise in the paper!  

Please consider placing an ad in the paper for your business or non-profit organization.  You can help to support our Community newspaper and our services like the Around the Town Calendar, and online access.  Consider running an ad or just sending in a contribution.  

Hope you enjoy the January  issue! Start submitting your news and articles for January issue now. 

Editor's Note:  The front page story has incorrectly spelled a person's name.  The press release listed Decorating Committee members, and those names were printed in the paper.   Alicia Schuff is on the Farmington Decorating Committee.  All apologies.


Friday, January 1, 2016

Farmington Corner January 2016

The Delicate Art of Clock Repair

By John Nolan

At the Farmington Historical Society’s November meeting, the Rev. Kent Schneider reminded everyone that the bicentenary of the First Congregational Church – the tall, pointy building on Main Street, for those folks new to town – is not that far distant. In order that a history can be prepared, as part of a planned celebration, he hopes that people can bring forth tales and tidings of the church and its congregation over the decades.

This put me in mind of the late Mr. Oakley, and a Farmington Corner piece from almost 30 years ago.  The opening sentence referred to a 1988 presidential candidate, Joe Biden, whose speeches, it had just been shockingly revealed, contained chunks lifted from the repertoire of a British politician -- and it all went thus:
Any similarity between the following article and the first two paragraphs of George Orwell's "1984" is a purely coincidental Bidenism …

It was a bright cold day in April, and the clock was striking 13. Then it packed in altogether. John Oakley, halfway through a cup of Mros's coffee, sighed deeply, and slipped quickly out of the variety store, but not quickly enough to prevent a swirl of gritty dust from blowing into the shop.
Showing the concern of a protective parent, he gazed up at the clock-face on the tower of the Congregational Church, opposite where he stood, and with an absent-minded gesture tossed his unfinished Styrofoam cup into the gutter, before crossing over Main Street. Behind him, a balding garbologist silently materialized to snatch the abandoned container before the snell wind could bowl it away.

John gained the stout grey door of the church, turned one of the iron handles, and went inside. The hallway smelt of dusty pews and old hymn books and at one end of it a colored poster, too large for indoor display, had been tacked to a wall. It depicted the enormous face of a man about 55, with baleful eyes that seemed to follow one about, as they gazed from under a police hat. 

"Big Brownie Is Watching You," the caption beneath the picture ran.

Opening a small door off the hallway, John Oakley came to the foot of a wooden ladder that disappeared up into the darkness of the church tower where the faulty machinery of the clock was located and with a spryness that belied his grey hair and lined face, he began to ascend the worn rungs.

It was a journey of great familiarity to the repairman because the enormous timepiece, of such pride to the citizens of Farmington, had been in need of his regular -- indeed, sometimes hourly -- attentions in recent years ... but such love did John Oakley bear for those enormous cogs and wheels and spindles which comprised the "workings" that his face revealed only affection and patience sprinkled with a scientific inquisitiveness. Reaching the top of the ladder, his hand gripped the first of the cleats nailed to the internal framing of the tower, and slowly he groped up the remaining 60 feet, to stand on a narrow platform abreast the clock.

Down in the street, little eddies of wind were whirling torn paper into spirals and sending Bud cans rattling along the sidewalk after which the garbologist would scurry, but John was lost to this world. His hand found the candle on an oak beam above him, which he lit, and in the flicker of light thrown by its dancing flame, he peered with the rapt concentration of an engineer at the bewildering arrangement of levers and counterweights in front of him. He hummed gently to himself as he scanned the shadowy cogs and ratchets, and cocked his head sharply and made a clicking noise when he considered that he had spotted the seat of the trouble.

"We'll soon have you going again, old clock," John Oakley informed the machinery with great warmth, his hand reaching up once more to the beam from whence he had extracted the candle. This time his hand tightened around a two-by-four, which he swung with astonishing determination at a flywheel, striking it with an almighty clang. The entire contraption shuddered, and then, with reluctance, chugged back into life. John carefully replaced the candle and the piece of lumber before descending from the tower, and emerged, with noticeable satisfaction, onto Main Street.
He crossed over to Mros's Variety Store and poured himself another cup of coffee. The word "minivictory" formed in his mind.
*    *     *     *     *
So there it is…a small contribution to the history of the First Congregational Church of Farmington (NH). Today, I believe, the clock has been electrified. At least, a few years back around $32,000 was spent up in that tower for something, and it probably wasn’t for gold-plating Mr. Oakley’s two-by-four.

And now, please relay your memories of the ecclesiastical institution to the Reverend Kent.